Pages

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Hoof Owie

Paj has crummy feet.  His youth was filled with thrown shoes, hoof abscesses and missing chucks of hooves.  When we moved to the ranch five years ago, these problems miraculously disappeared.  The move brought way more turnout time, better nutrition and a change of farrier; all excellent things for hooves.

Given Paj's past, I was a bit panicked when I saw this -


I emailed the photo to our farrier, who came ASAP.  He reassured me that it isn't as bad as it looks, and we aren't headed back to Hoof Hell.  Sometimes an owie is just an owie.  He put an acrylic patch on it so that Paj doesn't catch it on anything and rip the shoe off.  


Whew, I feel better.  But I'll be darn glad when this grows out.

I started thinking about technology, and how handy it is to be able to take photos and email them, which of course made me think about what it must have been like before phones.  Would you have to lead your horse to the village smithy?  And there wouldn't be any acrylic patching either.  And then I started thinking about vets and doctors in the old days.  We have it easy.

18 comments:

Jane and Lance Hattatt said...

Hello Terry,

Gosh, this looked really awful to us, but then we know next to nothing about horses or their hooves. Whatever, we too are relieved that this has been relatively easy to sort out. Indeed, when one is complaining about all the problems which have arisen in this age of technology, we rarely consider all the many benefits that have come too.

It is amazing with animals what a good diet and appropriate exercise will do for them. Our rescue cats looked a million times better for some proper meals and a good home.

Optimistic Existentialist said...

I hope the acrylic patch helps heal it. Hopefully it's just a boo-boo :)

A Brit in Tennessee said...

I worked with our local blacksmith during the summer holidays ( only six weeks in England ) however, I learned a lifetime of do's and don'ts during that brief time. Acrylic patch will help heal that hoof and keep its floppy bits intact.
Yes, good diet and lots of love, makes an amazing difference.
~Jo

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
sonia a. mascaro said...

I agree with your friends, a balanced and good diet and much love and care makes a great difference. :)

Dreaming said...

You are right about the conveniences we have today. I'm glad today's farrier can use acrylic patches… how handy! (Pippin had a similar experience and I loved that he was put together so easily!

Cindi said...

gosh, so happy Paj will be ok. It sure looked like alot of damage. How wonderful to just snap a pic to the vet. love technology!...

in2paints said...

Wonder how he managed to do that? Glad your farrier was able to come out quickly and get him all patched up!

Jim said...

This is incredible, Terry. I am happy that it isn't as bad as it looks. Amazing indeed what can be done for horse and man alike these days.

Fundy Blue said...

Yikes, poor Paj! I'm glad that he got patched up. I had to google "farrier," but now I know a new word. BTW, my Reader List gives me fits sometimes. It often tells me I have no blogs because I never signed up for any! Ha! My absences are usually due to life though! Have a great evening!

Beate said...

Oh boy, even without his past I would have been scared to see his hoof like this. I'm so happy to hear the farrier didn't think anything bad of it. The acrylic patch is a wonderful idea! I hope it'll grow out very fast and that there won't be anymore injuries like this to his hooves. Have a wonderful week! :) And thank you for your sweet comment on my blog, I'm so happy my pictures could make you smile :)

Em Parkinson said...

My old horse had endless problems with his feet including Navicular disease. I really feel for you and as our farrier used to say: no foot, no horse. Trigger was in a state when I got him too but he's barefoot; MUCH cheaper but it can be a lot of work packing small holes and separation. Everything crossed for you here!

Joe Bauman said...

Looks terrible, but I'm glad there's a fix. Does the hoof grow out like a fingernail, or is it always the same length? You have a great blog.

ted and bunny said...

hi!
thankyou for the lovely comment you left on my blog- I've been absent for a while- blogging began to feel a bit like a chore so I excused myself , and now I'm back refreshed, having realised I can simply blog when I want and enjoy it all the more!
Empathies with your hoof horrors, luckily Bruce has sturdy feet and I'm able to just have front feet shod and hinds trimmed unshod, but previous horses have been a nightmare, either too dry in summer or too wet in winter.
I remember as near back as early 1990s loading my horse in the trailer and taking him to be shod by our farrier who had a real old fashioned "smithy" Blacksmith Forge in a nearby village, but then things are a tad archaic in our neck of the woods!
I also have no blogs on my reader list :(
Kindest,
Elaine xx

Kate said...

Lucy gets this type of hoof owie all the time in the summer when her shoes have clips. Her feet get so brittle in the hot/humid weather, and she spends the day stomping them to get rid of the flies on her legs. This all makes for a very weak hoof wall and it crumbles around the clips.

For her, the key to fixing it and preventing it from happening again included a high quality hoof supp, fly boots for her legs so she is not stomping, and hardening solution for her feet.

I hope this isn't a chronic thing, since it sounds like you've gone a long time without any hoof problems!

Lady Lilith said...

Ouch that looks painful. I hope he grows out of it soon.

sonia a. mascaro said...

A Very Happy 4th July!

Dream Valley Ranch said...

Ouch! So glad the acrylic patch helped! I agree-we have it easy compared to the old days!!